IS IT WRONG TO BE FRUSTRATED WITH GOD?

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Frustration is that feeling of impatience and anxiety that we get when we think our needs are not being met or when we deal with seemingly insurmountable problems. Sometimes, God is the focus of our impatience and dissatisfaction—we become frustrated with Him. Frustration with God, His ways and His dealings with us can be a stumbling block for Christians. God could easily handle this problem—why doesn’t He? God knows I have a need—where is He? There are few Christians who have not been frustrated at the Lord for one reason or another at some point in their lives.

Martha is a case in point (Luke 10:38-42). Jesus was visiting her home, and Martha wanted to treat Jesus to a fine meal. Scripture says she “was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made.” Meanwhile, Martha’s sister, Mary, “sat at the Lord’s feet listening to what he said.” In her busyness, Martha felt she deserved some help in the kitchen, and her frustration boiled over. She “came to him and asked, ‘Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help me!’” Note that Martha was frustrated both with Mary for not helping and with the Lord for allowing Mary to be “lazy.” Jesus calmed His friend: “‘Martha, Martha,’ the Lord answered, ‘you are worried and upset about many things.’” He then took the opportunity to teach a lesson on being still and knowing God (cf. Psalm 46:10)—a lesson we forget when we are frustrated.

Another well-known story is that of Jonah. He, too, knew what it was to be frustrated with the Lord. Jonah heard from God, but he didn’t like what he heard (Jonah 1:1-3a). After reluctantly proclaiming God’s message to the Ninevites, Jonah was convinced that they would not listen and that he would have the satisfaction of seeing them slaughtered by a vengeful God. To Jonah’s chagrin, the Ninevites responded with repentance and humility toward God (Jonah 3:5-10). Jonah was frustrated. His sense of justice conflicted with God’s mercy. To make matters worse, the leafy plant under which Jonah had been taking shade was withered by God, leaving Jonah exposed to the blazing sun (Jonah 4:7). Jonah’s frustration mounted to the point of wanting to die (Jonah 4:9). God had to remind His angry prophet that his perspective was wrong: Jonah cared more for an insentient plant than for a great city full of people. Frustration can cloud our vision and choke our compassion.

Is it wrong to be frustrated with God? Yes, it is. Frustration is a product of our sinful human nature. Frustration with God could be evidence of a lack of trust in Him or a misunderstanding of who He is. If God is perfect—and the Bible says He is (Psalm 18:30)—then He has perfect intentions, perfect timing, perfect methods, and perfect results. As we focus our minds on the Lord and trust in Him, we will know peace, not frustration (Isaiah 26:3).

Our frustration with God could be a byproduct of our own stubbornness. When our ambitions conflict with God’s purposes, we will naturally be frustrated. It is never advisable to fight against God. Saul of Tarsus learned this lesson the hard way, and Jesus had to remind him, “It is hard for you to kick against the goads” (Acts 26:14). A simple prayer of humble submission gives far greater comfort than stubbornly insisting on our plans.

God tells earthly fathers, “Do not exasperate your children” (Colossians 3:21). Certainly, God does not wish to exasperate His own children. When we feel frustrated with God, it is due to a lack of understanding on our part, not any lack on God’s part. The best way to deal with being frustrated with God is to submit to His will, accept His timing, and trust His goodness. “Cast all your anxiety [and your impatience and frustration] on him because he cares for you” (1 Peter 5:7).

Prophet Nathan Emol

WHERE IS GOD WHEN LIFE HURTS SO MUCH?

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The Bible teaches that God reigns over the nations from His holy throne in heaven (Psalm 47:8; Isaiah 6:1, 66:1; Hebrews 4:16). Even though we know that God’s presence is in some sense uniquely in heaven, the teachings of Scripture also make it clear that God is omnipresent (present everywhere at the same time). From the beginning of Scripture, we see the presence of God hovering over the earth, even when it was still formless and empty (Genesis 1:2). God filled the world with His creation, and His presence and glory continue to inhabit the whole earth (Numbers 14:21). There are many examples throughout Scripture of God’s presence moving on the earth, interacting with His creation (Genesis 3:8; Deuteronomy 23:14; Exodus 3:2; 1 Kings 19:11-18; Luke 1:35; Acts 16:7). Hebrews 4:13 says, “Nothing in all creation is hidden from God’s sight. Everything is uncovered and laid bare before the eyes of him to whom we must give an account.” Jeremiah 23:24 exclaims, “‘Can anyone hide in secret places so that I cannot see him?’ declares the Lord. ‘Do not I fill heaven and earth?’ declares the Lord.” Psalm 139 is an amazing study in God’s omnipresence.

Where is God?
If you are a believer in Jesus Christ, God is with you, beside you, above you, and inside you. God’s presence and watchful care never leave you. If you are not a believer in Jesus Christ, God is right in front of you, inviting you, drawing you, offering you the love, mercy, and grace that He longs to give you. If you are unsure of your relationship with God through Jesus Christ, please read our article on how to “Get right with God.” Perhaps a better question than “Where is God?” is “Where are you, in relationship to God?”

Where is God when it hurts?
It seems we desire to know the answer to this question most when faced with painful trials and attacks of doubt. Even Jesus, during His crucifixion, asked, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” (Matthew 27:46). To the onlookers of that time, as well as to those who first read the story, it seems that God did forsake Jesus, so we obviously conclude that He will forsake us as well in our darkest moments. Yet, upon continued observation of the events that unfolded after the crucifixion, the truth is revealed that nothing can separate us from the love of God, not even death (Romans 8:37-39). After Jesus was crucified, He was glorified (1 Peter 1:21; Mark 16:6, 19; Romans 4:24-25). From this example alone we can be assured that even when we do not feel God’s presence in the midst of our pain, we can still believe His promise that He will never leave us nor forsake us (Hebrews 13:5). “God sometimes permits what He hates to accomplish what He loves” (Joni Erickson Tada).

We put our trust in the fact that God does not lie, He never changes, and His Word stands true forever (Numbers 23:19; 1 Samuel 15:29; Psalm 110:4; Malachi 3:6; Hebrews 7:21; 13:8, James 1:17; 1 Peter 1:25). We do not lose heart over painful circumstances because we live by faith in every word that has proceeded from the mouth of God, not putting our hope in what is seen or perceived. We trust God that our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs all the suffering that we will endure on this earth. So, we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, because we know and believe that what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal (2 Corinthians 4:16-18; 5:7). We also trust God’s Word, which says He is constantly working things together for the good of those who love Him and have been called according to His purpose (Romans 8:28). Even though we do not always see the good ends to which God is working things out, we can be assured that a time will come when we will understand and see more clearly.

Our lives are like a quilt. If you look at the back side of a quilt, all you see is a mess of knots and loose ends hanging out all over. It is very unattractive, and there seems to be no rhyme or reason to the work. Yet when you turn the quilt over, you see how the maker has craftily woven together each strand to form a beautiful creation, much like the life of a believer (Isaiah 64:8). We live with a limited understanding of the things of God, yet a day is coming when we will know and understand all things (Job 37:5; Isaiah 40:28; Ecclesiastes 11:5; 1 Corinthians 13:12; 1 John 3:2). Where is God when it hurts? The message to take with you in hard times is that when you cannot see His hand, trust His heart, and know for certain that He has not forsaken you. When you seem to have no strength of your own, that is when you can most fully rest in His presence and know that His strength is made perfect in your weakness (2 Corinthians 12:9-10).

Prophet Nathan Emol

WHY IS SEEKING GOD VERY IMPORTANT?

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In his letter to the church in Rome, Paul quotes an astonishing statement from the Psalms: “There is no one who understands; there is no one who seeks God” (Romans 3:11). How can Paul, and David before him, make such a sweeping declaration? Of all who have ever lived, not even one person has really sought after God? There’s no question that billions of people have sought after a god, but they have not always sought after the true God.

This fact ties directly to Adam and Eve’s sin prompted by Satan’s deception. Throughout the history of mankind, the treachery promulgated by Satan has been so thorough that the natural man can perceive only bits and pieces of the real truth about God. As a result, our conceptions about God are blurred. It’s only when God chooses to reveal Himself to us that the pieces begin to fall together as our eyes are opened to truth. Then, truly seeking God becomes possible.

Jesus tells us in John 17:3, “Now this is eternal life: that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent.” Here Jesus is telling us that our continuing to seek God, desiring to know Him more, is the essence of true life, eternal life. The most important thoughts our minds can entertain are thoughts of God, because they will determine the quality and direction of life. Seeking God, then, is an ongoing responsibility and privilege for all Christians.

But we also know that seeking God is not always an easy thing to do, not because God is elusive, but because our minds are saturated with misconceptions and deceits planted by Satan and reinforced by the culture, not to mention the sinful nature of our own hearts and the general deceitfulness of sin (Jeremiah 17:9; James 1:13–15). But the good news is that these mistaken beliefs are done away with through coming to know God and growing in our relationship with Him. This starts when we turn to Him for salvation and put our trust in Jesus Christ. When we are saved, we receive the indwelling Holy Spirit who helps us to know God and even transforms our hearts to want to seek Him (Ephesians 1:13–14; Philippians 1:6; 2:12–13; Romans 8:26–30). Romans 12:2 counsels, “Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—his good, pleasing and perfect will.” We learn the truth about God and seek Him through reading His Word (the Bible). We seek God also through prayer and in times of worship. We seek God both individually and corporately. Spending time with other believers in Jesus who are also seeking God is important to help us continue to seek Him (Hebrews 10:24–25).

Second Chronicles 15:2–4 is instructive for us. This passage was written over two thousand years ago to a people like us: “[Azariah the prophet] went out to meet Asa and said to him, ‘Listen to me, Asa and all Judah and Benjamin. The LORD is with you when you are with him. If you seek him, he will be found by you, but if you forsake him, he will forsake you. For a long time Israel was without the true God, without a priest to teach and without the law. But in their distress they turned to the LORD, the God of Israel, and sought him, and he was found by them.’”

Their instructions were simple: when they sincerely sought God, things went well, but when their desire to seek Him waned and eventually ceased altogether, their world came apart. Sin increased, morality declined, and contact with God ceased. The admonitions to the children of God of that time are clear to us today: “If you seek him, he will be found by you.” This profound principle is repeated throughout Scripture (Deuteronomy 4:29; Jeremiah 29:13; Matthew 7:7; Acts 17:27; James 4:8). The idea is that, when we draw near to God, He reveals Himself to us. God does not hide Himself from the seeking heart.

“But if from there you seek the LORD your God, you will find him if you seek him with all your heart and with all your soul” (Deuteronomy 4:29).

“You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart” (Jeremiah 29:13).

“Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you” (Matthew 7:7).

Prophet Nathan Emol

GULU – UGANDA CHARITY PROJECT 2020:


One the 7th February 2020, through the guidance of the Holy Spirit, Prophet Nathan together with RPM Ministries donated a total of 50 free Luo Bible and food stuff to the local church named Aftersoul Agender Ministries located in Gulu, in the northern part of Uganda. Gulu is a luo speaking region. Through the Ministry representative in East Africa, these free Bibles were given out so that this local church congregation can be boasted spiritually.

Gulu is a town in the Northern part of Uganda that suffered war for over 20 years in the hands of the rebels called LRA which killed so many people. These innocent souls needs much hope and encouragement. They need spiritual upliftment. They need support and comfort. As a result of what happened, many people live in fear and pain of the past. They need our prayers and care.

It is our responsibility to care for our fellow brothers and sisters. It is our responsibility to encourage them and give them hope and love. There is someone somewhere in need of your smile, love, hug, support, encouragement and saying everything will be alright. Millions of people are going through hard times, pain and sorrowful moments. They need us. They need our prayers and comfort. They need support with the little we have.

We do not give because we have alot but because giving is what touches the heart of God. We give because it is God’s command for us to help the needy. We give because we cannot afford to see a brother or sister in need and ignore. Anything we do to our beloved brothers and sisters who are in their needful moments, we are doing it unto the Lord Himself.

Let us see giving as an assignment from God. Wherever you are today, look for someone who is in need and do something that will improve their lives in one way or the other. God will use our hands as His. God will use our legs as His. God will use the whole of us as His. God will help the needy through us. Let us not ignore those around us who are suffering and in pain but let us lend them a helping hand and the name of the Lord will be uplifted.

We thank everyone who partner with us. Your generosity is changing lives and the name of God is being glorified.  As we change lives through your support, we are doing this assignment together. May God richly bless you. We will always keep praying for you and we know God who sees your continuous support will reward you mightily not only here on earth but eternity as well.

Prophet Nathan together with RPM Ministries

HOW TO KNOW GOD BETTER:

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Everyone knows that God exists. “God has made it plain” that He is real, “for since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that people are without excuse” (Romans 1:19-20). Some try to suppress the knowledge of God; most try to add to it. The Christian has a deep desire to know God better (Psalm 25:4).

In John 3 we read about a man who clearly wanted to know God better and who became more studied than most in the things of God. His name was Nicodemus, and he was a Pharisee, a ruler of the Jews. This Nicodemus knew that Jesus had come from God, and he was truly curious to learn more about Jesus. Jesus patiently explained to Nicodemus how he must be born again (verses 3-15). In order to know God better, Nicodemus had come to the right person—“In Christ all the fullness of the Deity lives in bodily form” (Colossians 2:9). Jesus is indeed the Word of God made flesh (John 1:14). Jesus revealed God through His words and works. He even said that no one comes to the Father but by Him (John 14:6). If you want to know who God is, look at Jesus.

So, we must start with faith. The first step in knowing God better is to know Jesus Christ, who was sent from God (John 6:38). Once we are born again by the power of the Holy Spirit, we can truly begin to learn about God, His character, and His will. “The Spirit searches all things, even the deep things of God” (1 Corinthians 2:10). By contrast, “the person without the Spirit . . . cannot understand [the things of God] because they are discerned only through the Spirit” (verse 14). There is a difference between the “natural” man and the “spiritual” man.

Romans 10:17 says, “So faith comes from hearing, and hearing by the Word of Christ.” It cannot be emphasized enough how the study of God’s Word, the Bible, is paramount to knowing God better. We must, “like newborn babies, crave pure spiritual milk, so that by it [we] may grow up in [our] salvation, now that [we] have tasted that the Lord is good” (1 Peter 2:2-3). God’s Word should be our “delight” (Psalm 119:16, 24).

Those who are learning more about God are also those who obey the command to be filled with the Holy Spirit. Born-again believers always have the Holy Spirit, but Ephesians 5:15-21 teaches us to walk in the Spirit and surrender to His will.

Prayer is also an important part of knowing God better. As we pray, we praise God for His character and for what He has done. We spend time with Him, relying on His power and allowing the Spirit to intercede for us “through wordless groans” (Romans 8:26).

Also consider that one can get to know God better by fellowshipping with other believers. The Christian life was not meant to be lived alone. We learn more about God through the preaching of God’s Word and the godly counsel of those who walk with Him. Make the most of your church experience, get involved, do small-group Bible study, go witnessing with fellow believers. Just like a log ablaze on the hearth soon goes out when it is removed and placed aside, so we will lose our fervor for God if we do not fellowship with other believers. But put the log back into the fire with the other logs, and it will burn brightly again.

To summarize how to get to know God better: 1) Accept Christ as your Savior. 2) Read His Word…it is alive (Hebrews 4:12). 3) On an on-going basis, be filled with the Holy Spirit. 4) Seek the Lord through prayer. 5) Fellowship and live out your life with the saints (Hebrews 10:25).

Prophet Nathan Emol